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Exhibitions

Temporary exhibitions

Alicja Biała

Polish Cut-Outs

Exhibition date: 06.10.2018 - 09.12.2018
Venue: MOCAK Library

Polish Cut-Outs by Alicja Biała are an ever-expanding collection of over 40 collages. The biggest ones are compositions more than two metres long. The exhibition will feature both new cut-outs and those illustrating Marcin Świetlicki’s selection of poems Poland (A Collection of Patriotic Songs).

Permanent Exhibitions

MOCAK Collection

Venue: Level -1

The new exhibition of the MOCAK Collection presents sculptures and objects that the Museum has acquired in the last three years.

Outdoor Exhibits From The MOCAK Collection

Outdoor Exhibits From The Mocak Collection is a group of artworks situated in the area surrounding MOCAK refers to four subjects: the Holocaust, history of art, history of politics and intervention in public space.

Krystian Lupa

Live Factory 2: Warhol by Lupa

Venue: Level -1

MOCAK Museum of Contemporary Art in Krakow, in collaboration with the Helena Modrzejewska National Stary Theatre in Krakow, is opening a new space as part of its Collection. We will be showing Krystian Lupa’s interactive installation Live Factory 2, based on the stage design for his theatre production Factory 2, which premiered at the Stary Theatre in 2008.

The Mieczysław Porębski Library

MOCAK’s Library is located in a side building. In one of the halls, Mieczysław Porębski’s Library is be exhibited. Porębski, Poland’s most prominent art historian, many years ago expressed his wish to donate his book collection to the Museum of Contemporary Art in Krakow. When the Museum came into being, he returned to that idea and handed over to the institution the Krakow part of his collection.

External Exhibitions

Witkacy: The Genius Troublemaker

Exhibition date: 07.09.2018 - 07.12.2018
Venue: Polish Institute in Düsseldorf

Witkacy started on his creative path as a painter. Painting, however, was to disappoint him. He came to see it as a craft, and so he set up the Portrait Painting Company, and painted some 4 500 portraits, the majority of which perished by fire in Warsaw during the war. The idea behind Witkacy’s company and its rules were a forerunner of conceptualism. He next experimented with image through photography, a medium in which he could see fully his wild, unbridled personality.